Category Archive: Core

Learning Smart

Instead of focusing on learning facts, we should first concentrate on how to best learn. Learning facts first often teaches thinking skills limited to the specific fact set. The result is rote memorization without the ability to self improve learning and thinking skills. Critical learning and thinking skills include: Observation – it’s important to know …

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Point of View Defines Problems

The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. F. Scott Fitzgerald The definition of a problem is two forces or ideas that seem to oppose each other. A spatial mapping of opposition involves vectors that are …

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A Definition of Consciousness

First, we need to note that consciousness is not the same thing as simple intelligence or analytical reasoning and thinking. Consciousness is a blend of an information baseline, the intelligence to manipulate the information to produce reasoning, and the self awareness of these processes. Typically, the information is provided by forms of sensory input, although …

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Synthetic Intelligence (SI)

As we develop intelligence, we learn to abstract basic patterns from the swirl of chaotic information around us. Then we learn to extrapolate expansions and trends based upon those basic abstractions and this allows us to begin to predict. By observing the success of our predictions, we can modify the process of abstraction and extrapolation …

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Ethical Quotient (EQ)

Facts that are useful become knowledge. It is simple to create the ability to access large amounts of facts. Google does this. We don’t consider Google to be intelligent, in fact, we don’t consider intelligent, a human being who does nothing but access large amounts of facts with no further reasoning involved. It is the …

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Structural Differential by Korzybski

The Structural Differential is a modeling technique that shows how layers of abstraction relate to each other. It was patented by Alfred Korzybski in 1925. Simple Abstraction describes a single layer of abstraction, where a label represents an event. Normal semantics involves many layers of abstraction. It is important to know and to keep track …

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Simple Observation

A simple observation process involves: Input – many different forms, starting with simple sensory input from a single channel Storing – abstracting some of the characteristics of the input and some form of making and storing a replica of them Indexing – a means of finding the replica copy of the abstractions Recall – a …

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Replication

Replication takes many forms: Atomic/Chemical – Strings combine into basic particles which combine into atoms. Atoms and molecules of atoms bond to each other according to the position of electrons in the outer shell. When atoms combine into crystals, they seem to seek a spatial symmetry that mirrors a harmony of energies. Across the scale …

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Simple Abstraction

When we abstract something, we single out an individual element from a collection of elements and separate it as a mental construct. This usually involves finding some kind of pattern of similarity, but it also involves discriminating between similarities and noticing differences. Because a truly motionless object is rare in the extreme, most of what …

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A Postulate of Mind

A mind is a system of thinking, analyzing and predicting. Simple organisms have simple minds that react to their environment in simple ways. Mostly, it involves a process of observation and some form of copying or replicating. A simple trial and error program might respond to a stimulus by either moving toward it or away …

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