Ethical Quotient (EQ)

Facts that are useful become knowledge. It is simple to create the ability to access large amounts of facts. Google does this. We don’t consider Google to be intelligent, in fact, we don’t consider intelligent, a human being who does nothing but access large amounts of facts with no further reasoning involved. It is the …

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Moore’s Brain in Lake Michigan

The article below is about robots taking human jobs. In the middle of the article is an interesting analogy that compares the growth rate in artificial intelligence to a task of filling Lake Michigan using Moore’s law. Lake Michigan was chosen because of a parallel between its volume in fluid ounces and the number of …

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A Taxonomy of Knowledge

A taxonomy is a framework for organizing knowledge. They are usually designed with a range of top level categories that are selected with the intent of being able to absorb most new knowledge within the scope limits of the taxonomy. It’s an outline that attempts to anticipate future needs by creating a master set of …

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Structural Differential by Korzybski

The Structural Differential is a modeling technique that shows how layers of abstraction relate to each other. It was patented by Alfred Korzybski in 1925. Simple Abstraction describes a single layer of abstraction, where a label represents an event. Normal semantics involves many layers of abstraction. It is important to know and to keep track …

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Cellular Automata Basics

Cellular automata consist of an array of “cells” and some rules of propagation regarding the cells. A simple array can consist of a row (1-Dimensional) of cells. A simple starting state is to “turn on” or mark the center cell in the row by coloring it black and allow cells to be either on (black) …

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Knowledge Mapping

Knowledge is more than just facts. Knowledge references facts, but also includes references to context that make the facts more usable and even the ability to use the facts well. Knowledge generally implies some level of skill or mastery in using facts and that the facts are considered to be true. In order to map …

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Simple Observation

A simple observation process involves: Input – many different forms, starting with simple sensory input from a single channel Storing – abstracting some of the characteristics of the input and some form of making and storing a replica of them Indexing – a means of finding the replica copy of the abstractions Recall – a …

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Replication

Replication takes many forms: Atomic/Chemical – Strings combine into basic particles which combine into atoms. Atoms and molecules of atoms bond to each other according to the position of electrons in the outer shell. When atoms combine into crystals, they seem to seek a spatial symmetry that mirrors a harmony of energies. Across the scale …

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Simple Abstraction

When we abstract something, we single out an individual element from a collection of elements and separate it as a mental construct. This usually involves finding some kind of pattern of similarity, but it also involves discriminating between similarities and noticing differences. Because a truly motionless object is rare in the extreme, most of what …

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A Postulate of Mind

A mind is a system of thinking, analyzing and predicting. Simple organisms have simple minds that react to their environment in simple ways. Mostly, it involves a process of observation and some form of copying or replicating. A simple trial and error program might respond to a stimulus by either moving toward it or away …

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