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Replication

Replication takes many forms:

  • Atomic/Chemical – Strings combine into basic particles which combine into atoms. Atoms and molecules of atoms bond to each other according to the position of electrons in the outer shell. When atoms combine into crystals, they seem to seek a spatial symmetry that mirrors a harmony of energies. Across the scale of atomic structure, we see basic ingredients replicating the same structures again and again.
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  • Genetic – DNA – As life forms, long strands of genetic code are embedded into DNA. The codes direct the production of proteins which determine functions. DNA includes a form of chemical replication that allows genetic templates to be reproduced and distributed.
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  • Memory – neural synapses can communicate signals to other neurons either by transmitting direct electrical signals or through chemical neurotransmitters that bridge a small gap between synapses. Either way, regulation of the neurotransmitters or transport proteins allows modulation of the signal. When neurons are arranged in an array, modulation can enable computational functions which can store and analyze data. By abstracting informational components of an experience, a “memory” can be created that can reconstruct the experience. The ability to abstract information and replicate it across time is key to knowledge engineering.
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  • Language/Writing – language and writing are more abstract forms of passing memories along through time. By creating semantic representations of abstractions, they can be passed from one individual to another at first through speaking and hearing, then eventually through writing and reading, which amplifies the ability to transmit across greater time and space.
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  • Photography/Holography – Creating chemical emulsions that can record visual abstractions allows point of view experiences to be recorded and viewed across time and space, just as language and writing, but at a greater resolution level. Holography adds to the spatial complexity without greatly increasing the amount of data required, by recording interference patterns, which are abstractions of events.
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  • Computer/Data – Computerized data and data structure can be replicated across network locations in real time if there are enough resources available. Accurate synchronization often requires building in extra data structure to enable tracking, accuracy verification and transaction roll-back or recovery options.
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  • Nano-assemblers – Nano machines will have the ability to produce tools and to self-replicate assembly machines, allowing near exponential growth of production capability. They will require supporting infrastructure in the form of advanced technology to program and control them, and either sources of raw materials in the format required, or other machines that can make the supplies.

This article comes from:
HackingTheUniverse.com